Day 90 – The Blowholes to Hamelin’s Pool

Our morning alarm was the sound of road trains roaring past the highway, but we were keen for an early start anyway so got straight on the road to the Blowholes – a spot north of Carnavon where the King Waves roll in and surfers flock to during winter to smash it out with the surf.

The beach at the Blowholes campground

The beach at the Blowholes campground

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Crazy king waves crashing against the cliffs

Crazy king waves crashing against the cliffs

 

It was pretty rough out there! Not super windy but the waves were crashing in to the rocks and making some dramatic sea spray regardless. And the blowholes themselves were amazing – big jets of water shooting up metres and metres into the air in a few split seconds, and then they were gone. Super exciting and sort of hypnotic to watch.

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Waterbending

Waterbending

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Blowholes!

Blowholes!

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We also spotted a ridiculous number of oysters in one of the slightly more sheltered enclave of rocks, so Trundle volunteered as tribute to attempt some seafood lunch but they were about as tough as the rocks, so no amount of bashing and smashing with our trusty knife would free them. Disappointing.

Risky oyster shucking attempts

Risky oyster shucking attempts

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Next stop was Hamelin’s Pool on the way to Shark Bay, to see some stromatolites – the world’s oldest ecosystems. They occur when micro bacteria band together particles underwater and create these living mats that look like rocks.

The stromatolites at Hamelin's Pool

The stromatolites at Hamelin’s Pool

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Boardwalk along the stromatolites beach

Boardwalk along the stromatolites beach

These things have been forming for nearly 3 billion years (75 per cent of the Earth’s biological history!) and influenced evolution by producing oxygen that gets released in to the atmosphere. Really fascinating things and we spent a fair bit of time wandering the boardwalks checking them out and watching swallows go to and from their nests in the gaps in the poles feeding their babies.

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Microbacterial mats!

Microbacterial mats!

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On the drive out we stopped to give way to a mumma emu and her 3 baby chicks who were out and about for the afternoon! We continued the drive in search of a campsite and pulled in to Fowler’s Camp, just south of Denham on the eastern side of the Shark Bay heritage area – a nice sheltered spot in a bay which was empty except for a single surfer dude and his van parked further along the road.

Camp at Fowler's Camp, Shark Bay

Camp at Fowler’s Camp, Shark Bay

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The sunset over the water at low tide was mind blowingly spectacular and vibrant, and it was lovely to be at a proper camping spot for a change rather than a rest stop or caravan park! We were both content, and excited to see some dolphins up at Monkey Mia early the next morning.

Beautiful light on the clouds from the sunset

Beautiful light on the clouds from the sunset

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Epic sunset over the bay

Epic sunset over the bay

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